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RULE 56.1 MOTIONS FOR SUMMARY JUDGMENT

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(a) Supporting Memorandum. The memorandum or brief in support of a motion for summary judgment must begin with a section that contains a concise statement of material facts as to which the movant contends no genuine issue exists. The facts must be numbered and must refer with particularity to those portions of the record upon which movant relies. All material facts set forth in the statement of the movant will be deemed admitted for the purpose of summary judgment unless specifically controverted by the statement of the opposing party.

(b) Opposing Memorandum.

(1) A memorandum in opposition to a motion for summary judgment must begin with a section containing a concise statement of material facts as to which the party contends a genuine issue exists. Each fact in dispute must be numbered by paragraph, refer with particularity to those portions of the record upon which the opposing party relies, and, if applicable, state the number of movant's fact that is disputed.

(2) If the party opposing summary judgment relies on any facts not contained in movant's memorandum, that party must set forth each additional fact in a separately numbered paragraph, supported by references to the record, in the manner required by subsection (a), above. All material facts set forth in this statement of the non-moving party will be deemed admitted for the purpose of summary judgment unless specifically controverted by the reply of the moving party.

(c) Reply Memorandum. In a reply brief, the moving party must respond to the non-moving party's statement of additional material facts in the manner prescribed in subsection (b)(1).

(d) Presentation of Factual Material. All facts on which a motion or opposition is based must be presented by affidavit, declaration under penalty of perjury, and/or relevant portions of pleadings, depositions, answers to interrogatories, and responses to requests for admissions. Affidavits or declarations must be made on personal knowledge and by a person competent to testify to the facts stated that are admissible in evidence. Where facts referred to in an affidavit or declaration are contained in another document, such as a deposition, interrogatory answer, or admission, a copy of the relevant excerpt from the document must be attached.

(e) Duty to Fairly Meet the Substance of the Matter Asserted. If the responding party cannot truthfully admit or deny the factual matter asserted, the response must specifically set forth in detail the reasons why. All responses must fairly meet the substance of the matter asserted.

(f) Notice to Pro Se Litigant Who Opposes a Summary Judgment Motion.  Any represented party moving for summary judgment against a party proceeding pro se must serve and file as a separate document, together with the papers in support of the motion, the following “Notice To Pro Se Litigant Who Opposes a Motion For Summary Judgment” with the full texts of Fed. R. Civ. P. 56 and D. Kan. Rule 56.1 attached.  Where the pro se party is not the plaintiff, the movant must amend the form notice as necessary to reflect that fact.

Notice To Pro Se Litigant Who Opposes a Motion For Summary Judgment

The defendant in this case has moved for summary judgment pursuant to Rule 56 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.  This means that the defendant has asked the court to decide this case without a trial, based on written materials, including affidavits, submitted in support of the motion.  The claims you assert in your complaint may be dismissed without a trial if you do not respond to this motion on time by filing sworn affidavits and/or other documents as required by Rule 56(c) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and by Local Rule 56.1 of the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas.  The full text of these two rules is attached to this notice.

In short, Fed. R. Civ. P. 56 provides that you may not oppose summary judgment simply by relying upon the allegations in your complaint.  Rather, you must submit evidence, such as witness statements or documents, countering the facts asserted by the defendant and raising specific facts that support your claim.  If you have proof of your claim, now is the time to submit it.  Any witness statements must be in the form of affidavits.  An affidavit is a sworn statement of fact based on personal knowledge stating facts that would be admissible in evidence at trial.  You may submit your own affidavit and/or the affidavits of others.  You may submit affidavits that were prepared specifically in response to defendant’s motion for summary judgment.

If you do not respond to the motion for summary judgment on time with affidavits and/or documents contradicting the material facts asserted by the defendant, the court may accept defendant’s facts as true, in which event your case may be dismissed and judgment entered in defendant’s favor without a trial.

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As amended 10/13, 9/00.